Libraries and Training: Where do we stand?

A recent article on Mashable cites the 2011 Training Industry Report that compared training data from 2010 to training data from 2011 and said, “The amount spent on training jumped about 13% from 2010, including increases in overall training budgets and payroll, and spending on outside products and services.”

The article goes on to say:

It’s anticipated that training will continue to be a major focus for organizations in the upcoming year, which makes sense: As our economy continues to move in a positive direction, consumers will demand better service. This translates to a need for customer service, management and leadership training, which are poised to see increases in 2012.

Is this true for your organization? There was a time when it seemed that libraries were on the cutting edge of training compared to private industries. We had 23 Things before most private industries even allowed access to Facebook and Twitter. But with all the budget cuts to libraries, is training one of the things being cut? And if training is being cut, what is the impact long-term to libraries?

Make sure to read the rest of the article. The three social learning trends to watch in 2012 is an interesting read. Many of us are already there on a personal level as far as social learning, but are our libraries there on an organizational level? If not, what do we need to do to get them there? If so, what do we need to do to move forward?

Upcoming Online Workshops

An Introduction to E-Readers for Libraries

In this four hour class taught in two, two hour increments on consecutive days, participants will first examine the history of e-text and free sources for e-content as well as digital rights management. Next we’ll examine the variety of e-readers on the market today as well as the pros and cons of each. On the second day we will discuss ideas for circulating and programming with e-readers and look at examples of libraries with successful e-reader programs.

Learning Outcomes

  • Understand the basics of digital rights management.
  • Be familiar with at least three resources for free e-content.
  • Be able to recognize a Barnes and Noble Nook and Amazon Kindle as well as discuss the pros and cons of each.
  • Know what needs to be considered in planning to circulate or plan a program with e-readers.

Lyrasis, Tuesday, January 24 and Wednesday, January 25, 2012 10am-12noon EST

Register here: http://www.lyrasis.org/Classes%20and%20Events/Catalog/A/An%20Introduction%20to%20EReaders%20for%20Libraries%20Live%20Online.aspx

 

Cultivating a Culture of Learning in Your Library

How much time does your library spend on “training?” Statistics show that most learning takes place on the job or with a coworker, yet as trainers we spend an inordinate amount of time preparing for and delivering classroom training. In this webinar you will learn why you need to get your staff out of the classroom and instead focus on creating a culture of learning in your library. We explore:

  • The differences between training and learning
  • The benefits to libraries for creating a culture of learning
  • The key elements of a learning organization
  • Tips for creating a culture of learning in any size library

NEFLIN, Tuesday, January 26, 2012 10am – 11:30am EST

Register here: http://neflin.actevapsn.com/view_my_events.php

Free for NEFLIN members. Anyone outside of Florida should contact register@neflin.org for fees and registration procedures.

 

Building a Personal Learning Solution

Learning never stops and no one person can know it all, do it all, or learn it all! Get help fast, when you need it, by calling on experts in your personal learning network. Take advantage of additional opportunities to learn from your network of peers, with tools like Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. By the end of the session, participants will develop an action plan for creating their own personal learning solutions.

In this session, participants will be able to:

  • Crowdsource answers to questions big and small from your personal learning network
  • Employ tips from learning professionals to stave off burnout and information overload
  • Create their own personal online learning environments
  • Develop strategies for cultivating and using learning networks

LibraryLinkNJ, Tuesday, January 31, 2012 3-4pm EST

Register here: http://librarylinknj.org/content/building-personal-learning-solution

Free for New Jersey library staff.

5 Reasons why training is a hot career for the next decade and beyond

US News and World Report named Training Specialist as one of the 50 top careers for 2011 in the business category. The headline says that training will continue to see “strong growth over the next decade.”

By 2018 jobs will increase by 23% for trainers.

I have several theories about why training will continue to be a hot career.

  1. As the aging workforce retires, new people will need to be trained for those positions. Leadership, executive training, and coaching will see exponential growth in the coming decades.
  2. As the economy improves many workers will change companies, jobs, or even careers. As this happens we’ll see an increased need for onboarding as well as basic skills training in nearly every industry.
  3. As technology continues to have huge impacts on the way we work and play,  training is needed to not only teach workers how to use the technology but how to best utilize the technology to interact with clients and customers. Who would have thought five or even two years ago that Facebook would be a corporate communications tool. Additionally social networking tools have created new mediums for trainers to work in.
  4. Skills possessed by trainers transfer to other industries. Once you know the principles of instructional design and learner-centered training, you can develop training for any organization.
  5. Training is fun and rewarding. Training is one of those jobs where you feel good at the end of the day. You know you’ve made a difference, and it’s an awesome feeling to watch employees’ skills and talents grow.

I’d love to hear from you. What do you love about training, and what are your predictions for the future of the industry?

Workplace Learning & Leadership: A Handbook for Library and Nonprofit Trainers

Two years of writing and interviewing and our book is almost here. Workplace Learning & Leadership: A Handbook for Library and Nonprofit Trainers is available for pre-order from the American Library Association.

Workplace Learning and LeadershipThe best kind of learning is that which never ends—and a culture of training means that staff will be more flexible and responsive to new ideas and strategies, imperative in today’s libraries. In this practical resource, leading workplace trainers Signorelli and Reed offer guidance on improving the effectiveness of training programs. Their book takes readers through the entire process of developing, implementing, and sustaining training programs and communities of learning, in order to

  • Empower individuals to become leaders and teachers by cultivating a culture of ongoing learning
  • Connect library staff and users to information resources so they can effectively use them to their benefit
  • Develop skills among both managers and workers for practicing continuous formal and informal training

Using real-life examples of trainers who serve as leaders within libraries and their communities, this book sheds light on an underappreciated but important component of library operations.

You can read an excerpt from the book here.

Get More (important things) Done

Earlier this month I presented an online training session to the great folks at NEFLIN on time management and getting things done. The training was based on my personal time management style which is a combination of David Allen’s Getting Things Done and Sally McGhee’s Take Back Your Life which gives detailed instructions on how to implement GTD with Microsoft Outlook.

The slides from the session are below and over the next few months I will be writing a series of posts about time management with the best tips and techniques that I have learned. Time management is my passion, so I hope you will follow along and pass this along to your friends.