Libraries and Training: Where do we stand?

A recent article on Mashable cites the 2011 Training Industry Report that compared training data from 2010 to training data from 2011 and said, “The amount spent on training jumped about 13% from 2010, including increases in overall training budgets and payroll, and spending on outside products and services.”

The article goes on to say:

It’s anticipated that training will continue to be a major focus for organizations in the upcoming year, which makes sense: As our economy continues to move in a positive direction, consumers will demand better service. This translates to a need for customer service, management and leadership training, which are poised to see increases in 2012.

Is this true for your organization? There was a time when it seemed that libraries were on the cutting edge of training compared to private industries. We had 23 Things before most private industries even allowed access to Facebook and Twitter. But with all the budget cuts to libraries, is training one of the things being cut? And if training is being cut, what is the impact long-term to libraries?

Make sure to read the rest of the article. The three social learning trends to watch in 2012 is an interesting read. Many of us are already there on a personal level as far as social learning, but are our libraries there on an organizational level? If not, what do we need to do to get them there? If so, what do we need to do to move forward?

IL2009: Sneaking the Social Web Into Your Library & Going Beyond 23 Things

I presented this session Monday afternoon with Bobbi Newman and Erin Downey-Howerton. My portion of the session, 23 Things & Beyond, reviewed Learning 2.0 and 23 Things. There were people in the audience who still had not heard of this great program. I introduced the key principles of 23 Things programs connection, collaboration, play, and prizes. Then I presented some ideas for what to do after a 23 Things program.

The challenge here is how to continue the momentum when the prizes are given out and the official program is over. When does learning become its own reward for staff? I shared the Learning 2.1 site which is where PLCMC continued its Web 2.0 learning.  I also shared Learn Chat a twitter based discussion group for trainers that takes place on Twitter on Thursday nights.

One of the keys to engaging learners online is to reach out to them in their native environments. Many of our staff are already on Facebook so that has become a natural place for me to reach them. I’ve begun posting status updates during the day to let staff know where I am and how they can reach me. A few staff contact me regularly through Facebook chat to ask questions about training and registration. I foresee some research in my future about demonstrating the value of allowing staff to use social networking sites while at work.

I ended the presentation with the steps to creating a marketing/learning/really any plan.

  1. Identify a need.
  2. Research.
  3. Identify the audience.
  4. Identify objectives. Output or outcome?
  5. Craft your message.
  6. Find the right platform/tools.
  7. Develop a plan.
  8. Evaluate. How will you know what worked?

Notice that you don’t even consider whether to use Facebook, Twitter, or blogs until step 6. It’s crucial to first identify a need, your audience, and objectives before thinking about how to get your message out. That’s not to say that you can’t play. Play is essential for learning! But when you are creating a strategic, long-term plan it’s important to lay the groundwork for success.

Webinar: Social & Informal Learning

Social & Informal Learning: The Business Opportunity
Wednesday, March 18, 2009 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EDT

If learning were an iceberg, then formal training and development would only be the tip. Most learning is “informal” in nature, but this portion lies beneath the proverbial waterline, virtually invisible and, therefore, much harder to navigate.

  • But such navigation is becoming increasingly important. New research from an i4cp survey, commissioned by the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD), reveals social and informal learning opportunities for companies that need to improve productivity and performance in 2009.
  • Social and informal learning already has a strong presence in many organizations and is expected to increase.
  • Very little of most firms’ training budgets are devoted to informal learning
  • Using social and informal learning pays dividends, as there is a significant correlation with reported market performance

Join internationally recognized futurist Elliott Masie and i4cp’s VP of Research Jay Jamrog as they examine this research and provide solutions on how to drive productivity and performance by implementing effective social and informal learning strategies. Takeaways include:

  • What social and informal learning approaches are currently working for organizations
  • Where are the gaps that can serve as opportunities
  • How can organizations put social and informal learning strategies into action sooner rather than later

Register here: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/195339614

I really wish I could attend this but I will be at training all day. If anyone attends and gets a link to the archive please share it with me! :)

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