My 2010 Edublog Nominations

Nominations are open for the 2010 Edublog Awards.

The Edublog Awards is a community based incentive started in 2005 in response to community concerns relating to how schools, districts and educational institutions were blocking access of learner and teacher blog sites for educational purposes.

The purpose of the Edublog awards is promote and demonstrate the educational values of these social media.

The best aspects include that it creates a fabulous resource for educators to use for ideas on how social media is used in different contexts, with a range of different learners.

It introduces us all to new sites that we might not have found if not for the awards process.

My nominations are as follows:

  • Best individual blog – Kevin Jones, Engaged Learning: Always engaging, always interesting, Kevin blogs about a wide range of topics related to training and learning. My favorite posts are his posts about social learning. His ideas are brilliant! p.s. Kevin I appreciate you letting me borrow some of your content for a presentation I gave last year. :)
  • Best individual tweeter – Guy W. Wallace, @guywwallace: Guy tweets not only about learning and education but about performance improvement — which is at the heart of corporate and workplace learning.
  • Best new blogLibraries and Transliteracy: Transliteracy, the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, is the skill for the 21st century. The authors share a wide range of information, presentations, and resources useful for anyone working in education.
  • Best resource sharing blog:  Sarah Houghton-Jan, The Librarian in Black: As her tagline says Sarah is well-informed and shares news about tools and resources for learning and libraries. She considers the challenges that the average user faces and frames her post around those challenges.
  • Most influential blog post: Peter Bromberg, 10 Steps to Promote Learning in Your Conference Presentation: How many of us have sat through a conference or continuing education session where the speaker reads from the slides or worse the script? Peter Bromberg wrote a wise, thoughtful post that anyone presenting at a conference should be required to not only read but sign as a pledge.
  • Best librarian / library blog – Buffy Hamilton, The Unquiet Librarian: Buffy Hamilton shares her experiences as the media specialist/teacher-librarian at Creekview High School in Canton, Georgia. Buffy is at the cutting edge of providing library services to her students. A frequent presenter at conferences around the country, Buffy is highly respected and admired by her peers.
  • Best elearning / corporate education blogRapid E-Learning Blog: 67,000 readers can’t be wrong. The Rapid E-Learning Blog is my number one reading recommendation to anyone creating e-learning!
  • Best educational podcast: Maurice Coleman, T is for Training Podcast: Coleman hosts a biweekly recorded show on Talk Shoe that is podcast for listeners. Trainers and educators can call in and talk with their peers about current issues in learning. T is for Training is a learning experience for callers and listeners alike!
  • Best educational use of a social network: Helene Blowers, 23 Things: The original 23 things program has been replicated world-wide by hundreds, maybe thousands of libraries, schools, and other organizations. In the 23 Things program participants are taken step-by-step through using social networks and Web 2.0 tools while actually using those tools. This is the program that put social networking on the map for many organizations.

Those are my nominations! You have until Friday, December 3rd to make yours!

Wiki Who: What Web 2.0 Can Do For You (and Your Learners)

Here is a copy of the slides I used for tonight’s ASTD Charlotte presentation on libraries, Learning 2.0, and Web 2.0. I spent hours and hours searching for just the right images to get the message across with out limited bullet points.

Here’s a tip. Everytime you come across an image that you think you might be able to use one day for a presentation–tag it, bookmark it, or mark it as a Favorite. It’s nice to have a selection ready to choose from. The quality and range of photos on Flickr with a creative commons license is astounding.

p.s. Thank you Helene and Kevin for sharing.

Wiki Who? What Web 2.0 Can Do for You

If you are in the Charlotte, NC area next Thursday I’ll be presenting a program for the ASTD Charlotte Chapter. I’m really excited about this opportunity because about 10 years ago when I decided I wanted to work full-time in learning & development I joined ASTD. I can’t tell you how much membership in my local chapter has helped me professionally and now it’s my turn to give back.

Wiki Who? What Web 2.0 Can Do for You
Thursday, April 16, 2009 from 6:15-8pm

How do you bring over 500 employees with a wide range of computer skills up to date on the best of Web 2.0—blogs, wikis, RSS feeds, and all the 2.0 tools? More importantly, how do you accomplish this effectively in only two months with a limited budget and only a handful of trainers?

Learn how the Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County created and implemented the award winning Learning 2.0/23 Things program that has been replicated by libraries, schools, universities, and businesses world-wide. This unique program focuses on collaboration and group interaction to teach Web 2.0 using Web 2.0. Best of all it’s free and creative commons licensed so you can replicate the program for your organization.

You’ll also learn how to use Web 2.0 tools and free resources available from your local public library to support your own learning and career development.

Details and registration are here:

http://astdcharlotte.org/meetings_events.html#future_mtgs

23 Things Summit

“23 Things” is a revolutionary staff development learning concept centered on social collaboration tools. Helene Blowers successfully created the first program while at the Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County.

Thousands of libraries and library organizations of every size and type have adapted the idea for their staff. Hands-on, self-directed, and innovative, 23 Things style programs have introduced many, many library staff, volunteers, trustees, and others to 2.0 tools like blogs and wikis.

During this 2 hour Summit, organizers from several successful programs around the nation will share best practices and lessons learned. Participants will be able to ask questions and seek advice to help in implementing a similar program.

Who should attend? If you are involved with library training, if you are thinking about implementing a 23 things style program, or if you have already implemented a 23 things style program and want to share what you’ve learned, then this session is for you!

WebJunction, MaintainIT, the State Library of Kansas, and the Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library are collaborating to create this event.

Date: 3/3/2009
Start Time: 2:00 PM EST
End Time: 4:00 PM EST

Register here.

7 1/2 Habits of Highly Successful Lifelong Learners Redux

When Helene Blowers first asked me to put together a tutorial to kick off Learning 2.0, I had no idea that it would be seen by so many people. The feedback I’ve received has been amazing.

7 1/2 Habits of Highly Successful Lifelong Learners was actually my first attempt at creating online training. I thought I’d share what I’ve learned as a result.

  1. When you put yourself out there on the Web and ask for feedback, you are going to get feedback! I have received hundreds of emails with comments about the tutorial. 99% of the comments have been positive but I have to admit the negative ones do sting a bit. You have to develop a thick skin because not everyone will offer constructive criticism. Take it with a grain of salt, learn from it, and move on!
  2. Brevity is key! 14-minutes was a little long for this tutorial. 10-minutes is the maximum for any training segment (this goes for face to face training too). If you are going more than 10-minutes you need to break the tutorial up into smaller chunks. In the book The Ten-Minute Trainer Sharon Bowman explains that, “Television has conditioned us to expect fast-paced, attention-getting methods of informational delivery.” Television programs usually have 10-minutes of programming followed by 5-minutes of commercials. We have become conditioned to expect this type of programming. We do more for our learners if we accept and work with this idea rather than try to fight it.
  3. Alternate voices. Ideally alternate between a male and female voice. This keeps the attention of your learners.

They say that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery so imagine my surprise when I received an email from a teacher who asked if she could recreate the tutorial and gear it towards K-12 educators.Shelley Paul, a teacher from the Atlanta area, has done a marvelous job repurposing this tutorial for her staff’s Learning 2.0 program.

Shelley used a free tool called VoiceThread to create the tutorial. I really like the way VoiceThread lets viewers leave not only written comments but recorded comments as well. I enjoyed listening to all the different voices and reflections that her learners had during the tutorial. I can’t wait to try this tool for my next project! If you have a few minutes check out Shelley’s version below.