Lori Reed | A Passion for Learning | Meredith Farkas

Computers in Libraries 25th Annual Conference Next Week

If you are planning to attend Computers in Libraries next week, I’ll be moderating the Teaching: Technologies & Approaches track on Tuesday. Please drop by and say hello. If you can’t attend check back on this site. I will be blogging notes from the sessions here and tweeting as well.

Here’s the outstanding line up in the track!

TRACK E ● Teaching: Technologies & Approaches
Regency A/B/C/D, Ballroom Level
Speakers share their vast experience to help you select the right tools and methods for your environment and the learners involved. Moderated by Lori Reed, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.

E201 ● LMS: What’s Out There & How to Decide!
10:30 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.
Lori Reed, Learning & Development Coordinator, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library
Chad Mairn, Information Services Librarian, St. Petersburg College
With so many learning management systems on the market, including the freebies and open-source, where do you start? Reed explains what to expect from an LMS and LCMS (learning content management system), what’s available — from the most popular to the unknown — selection criteria for choosing a system (including factoring in costs for open-source), and how to get buy-in from administration.

E202 ● Reaching Reluctant Learners
11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Jill Hurst-Wahl, Assistant Professor of Practice, Syracuse University School of Information Studies and President, Hurst Associates, Ltd.
Sophia Guevara, Librarian, MLIS Technology Consultant
Veronica Rutter, Collection Development Librarian, New City Library
Andrea Simyak, Instruction and Funding Information Librarian, New Jersey State Library

With the U.S. President totally “connected,” and with many government forms, job applications, and college courses online, being digital is almost required. Sadly, being digital is not the norm for everyone. How do we move late adopters — both staff and library users, including professors, attorneys, or senior citizens — out of their nondigital comfort zones? This session provides tips and techniques for moving them to the online world and describes two different methods instructors used to bring technology into their libraries — structured, weekly, hands-on classes and staff members participating in Technology Tapas, a self-paced, online weekly tutorial modeled after the 23 Things program created by Helene Blowers and implemented at the Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County. These two radically different instruction methods met the needs of their respective libraries because of the instructors’ determination to overcome the reluctance and fear of their learners.

E203 ● Training in the Cloud or Mobile Labs!
1:30 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Maurice Coleman, Technical Trainer, Harford County (Md.) Public Library, & Host, T is for Training (Library Training podcast)
Bobbi Newman, Digital Branch Manager, Chattahoochee Valley Library System
Delores Rondinella, Technology Training Coordinator, Stark County District Library
Jeffery Kreger, Emerging Technologies Systems Administrator, Stark County District Library

Talk about innovative training approaches! Newman and Coleman show how to use “The Cloud” to develop, schedule, organize, market and evaluate training for free or with very minimal expenditure. Rondinella and Kreger describe how Stark County successfully grew a mobile patron/staff training lab. Their overview includes: purchasing and maintenance of the mobile lab and its hardware, policies regarding training and server access (Coping with your IT Department), and developing an effective class curriculum for the community.

E204 ● Virtual Learning & Training: From Classrooms to Communities
2:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Alison Miller, Manager, ipl2 Reference Services, Drexel University
Meredith Farkas, Head, Instructional Initiatives, Norwich University

Learning and training occurs in synchronous, asynchronous, and hybrid environments. Miller identifies which category of learner may benefit best from both the type of environment and the delivery methods used. Farkas teaches for San Jose State University’s School of Library and Information Science using Drupal and other social software tools in place of the traditional course management system. She discusses how she uses Web 2.0 technologies to transform the learning experience and how others can harness the power of these technologies in their own teaching.

E205 ● Instructional Technology: It’s a Team Thing
4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Lynda Kellam, Data Services & Government Information Librarian;
Beth Filar Williams, Distance Education Librarian;
Amy Harris, Information Literacy and Reference Librarian;
Hannah Winkler, Libraries’ Digital Designer;
University Libraries, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

During a time of budget crises and belt tightening, new approaches to the instructional librarian role need to be invented. A team approach permits collaboration across departments and skill sets. Hear how one university has a team incorporating the skills of the information literacy librarian, distance education librarian, digital designer, and the data services librarian. This panel discusses how they support instructional technology, accomplish projects without budgetary support, and walk through their workflow for a project to demonstrate how collaboration on a shoestring can work to benefit their users.

Advice to the 2010 Movers & Shakers

It’s almost that time of year when a new crop of Library Journal Movers & Shakers is announced. Because they’ve been keeping this secret for months, the 50 or so selected are anxiously waiting for the public announcement. Like Survivor, it’s against the rules to tell anyone you were selected before the big reveal on March 15th.

As a 2009 recipient, here are a few pieces of advice for the Class of 2010.

  1. Be prepared to explain “what you did.” Rehearse your elevator speech! I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been asked what I “won” for. Yes I’m an advocate for learning. But try explaining to another advocate for learning specifically what you did that earned you the recognition. In reality it could just be that someone took the time to complete the nomination.
  2. Do not send an announcement or personal press release to American Libraries, LIS Wire or any other library news agency. Do send an announcement to your alma mater, hometown newspaper, parents, grandparents, long lost aunts or anyone else who might send you money.

    Movers & Shakers Salt & Pepper Shakers

  3. Be prepared for lots of “moving and shaking” puns as well as “shaking and moving” puns and really any combination of the two words such as: “Are you moving and shaking today?” or  “Do you prefer that martini shaken or moved?” or the always challenging “How exactly do you catalog moving and shaking?”
  4. Be prepared for anything from a big party to nothing at all when the announcement makes its rounds in your organization. It’s a different experience for everyone and even different within the same organization. Read this great article from the October 1, 2008 issue of Library Journal written by Chrystie Hill & Meredith Farkas to see what others have experienced. No matter what happens, take it in stride.
  5. Thank the people who nominated you. If you don’t already know who nominated you, it should become clear when you read the article. If you’re still in doubt contact the author or editor who wrote the piece about you.
  6. Thank your spouse/partner/cat/dog, your director, your boss, your coworkers. Thank everyone and make each one feel like it’s his or her award too!
  7. Take a few days or weeks to privately relish your accomplishment then get back to doing the great work you do that got you nominated. Being named a Library Journal Mover & Shaker is the beginning not the end of great work to come. You’ll find that you have easier access to resources to embark on new projects. Embrace this opportunity.
  8. Mark your calendar for September/October when nominations begin for next year’s award. Sitting down to write a nomination for another colleague is a wonderful capstone to the experience.

Most of all cherish the moment, be humble, way to go, and congratulations!

What advice do you have for the new crop of Movers & Shakers?