Five Tips for Getting Up-to-Speed on a Genre Using NoveList

Photo courtesy of:http://www.flickr.com/photos/vblibrary/

Photo courtesy of:http://www.flickr.com/photos/vblibrary/

You can’t read every book, so how can you be an effective readers’ advisor in the face of an unfamiliar genre? Check out my story and tips on the NoveList Blog: Five Tips for Getting Up-to-Speed on a Genre.

The Hyperlinked Library MOOC

If you haven’t heard about MOOCs yet, take a few moments to read or listen to this story on NPR, How MOOCs are Changing Higher Ed, and read the MOOC entry on Wikipedia.

This fall we’ll see one of the first library science MOOCs offered by San Jose State University assistant professor Michael Stephens and lecturer Kyle Jones. From the SLIS site:

The Hyperlinked Library MOOC will examine various participatory theories of library service, the impact of emerging technologies on libraries, and the growing focus on a creation/curation culture. Students will explore the definition of participatory service, some key trends that impact the Hyperlinked Library model, and examine what the shift means for libraries and information work in today’s digital information age.

Having seen Stephens present this topic several times, I’m excited to see a full course developed around his innovative ideas that is open to a broad audience (you don’t need an MLS to apply). I’ve heard the excitement library staff have after hearing Stephens give a keynote, and this course will offer an opportunity for learners to go deeper and and apply some of the ideas presented back in their own libraries.

I was surprised to see the course limited to 200 since MOOCs usually have 10 or 20 times that number, but it’s probably a smart idea to ensure that everyone has a good experience. After all can you imagine a discussion board with 20,000 librarians? The ALA Think Tank has just over 3,000 and I can’t keep up!

There’s no indication on how many people have registered so far for the course, but you can sign up here to receive more information.

What are your professional/personal development goals for 2013?

image of my journals

30 Years of Journals

Since I was in elementary school, I’ve kept a journal. I’ve written about everything from crushes on boys to having a baby to the joys and tears that come with moving and having a new job. Every year on New Year’s Eve I write about the past year and remember the good, the bad, and sometimes even the ugly. Then I write goals for the next year. This year I was so tired on New Year’s Eve I went to bed early, and I must confess I haven’t set a goal yet. New Year’s Day is really an arbitrary day and we could pick any day of the year to take stock, assess, and reassess.

I already know in my head what my goals are. I’ve brainstormed them at random times for the past month. But there is something about putting that goal down on paper and signing your name to it that makes it real, makes it a contract. So this year I’m skipping my paper journal and sharing my goals here. I hope that this will not only make me more accountable but that it will also inspire you to do the same.

Personal

  • Focus on less. The Power of Less by Leo Babauta is an excellent read. I have too much physical and virtual clutter in my life. I’m archiving all 3,500 unread Gmail messages and starting over with 0. I’m archiving photos to DVDs and selecting only the best to keep on my hard drive. I’m deleting files I no longer need. I’m taking two days off work this week to finish unpacking and declutter my home. This weekend it will be my children’s turn to do the same in their rooms. I am tossing anything that does not have meaning, importance, or is something that I am not in love with.
  • Focus on myself and my family. My children are at ages, 5 and 8, where they want and need constant attention from me when I am not working. I’ve cut down on nearly all my outside commitments to focus on them. In a few short years they will want to spend more time with their friends, so I don’t want to miss a moment of this precious time when their brains and hearts are like sponges ready to learn, love, and be loved. I made the difficult decision to put off graduate school until my kids are older. I have no regrets and feel relived by my decision. As I’ve said in the past, we can have it all, just not all at the same time.

Professional

  • Make email a tool for me, and not let myself become a slave to email. Enough said! When I figure out how to do this I’ll let you know.
  • Connect with customers. Now that I’ve learned much about my organization and its products and met some initial short term goals, I’ll be reaching out to customers in my role as customer relationship coordinator. My job is to make sure customers are having the best possible experience with our products and maximizing use of their products. I will help customers succeed in their goals.
  • Just like my personal email, I’m clearing out my RSS feeds and limiting myself to 10 feeds. When I can manage 10, I’ll add 5 more, and so on. Having more than 500 feeds is counterproductive and causes me to be so overwhelmed I just don’t look at them.
  • Complete my Facebook best practices for professionals project. Look for an updated survey soon!

So these are my goals for 2013. What are yours?

ALA Learning Round Table Continuing Education Award (Deadline this Thursday)

Are you a learner?

Do you want to attend a training event between July 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014?

Are you keen on sharing your knowledge with other Learning Round Table members?

Apply now!

The ALA Learning Round Table will award up to $1,000 for a member to attend a professional development event and share their new learning with other round table members. This could be a conference, workshop, or other event in your town or the funds could be used for travel as well.

The deadline is January 10, 2013 to submit this application (https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/LearnRT )and two letters of support. Letters of support and other supplemental application materials can be emailed to smorris@coloradostatelibrary.org.

This grant, named after our much admired past-president, the late Pat Carterette, is designed to honor her passion for professional development in the field of library and information sciences.  A former staff development coordinator at the Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library and the first Continuing Education Coordinator for the State Library of Georgia, Pat always focused on providing outstanding educational opportunities for her colleagues to grow and develop within their career field. She believed in quality library service, leadership development, and continual learning. In honor of Pat’s spirit of learning we offer this award to the Learning Round Table membership.

Generation Now: Surviving & Thriving With Multiple Generations in the Workplace

I’m presenting a break out session this afternoon on one of my favorite topics, generations in the workplace. Below are the slides and handout for the presentation. Thank you University of Wisconsin Madison campus for being such a wonderful host!

PDF of Slides

Generation Now Handout